Icon for Winners Announced!

Winners Announced!

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Teehan+Lax

Agency of the Year

Teehan+Lax have worked on Medium, Readability, social shopping platform Krush and Google Street View Hyperlapse. Since they started in 2002, they’ve been focussed on designing digital products and services that people use.

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Agency

New Agency of the Year

Agency is a not-for-profit creative studio for social change based in Sydney. It takes on projects that further human development, foster human rights and drive social equity. The studio works across branding, video, digital and user experience.

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Government Digital Service

Team of the Year

GDS is leading the digital transformation of the UK government to make it simpler, clearer and faster. In less than two years GDS has hired over 200 staff and shipped an award-winning service with Gov.uk.

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Chris Coyier

Outstanding Contribution

Chris founded and works full time at CodePen, a browser-based HTML, CSS and JavaScript editor with instant code previews and sharing functionality. He is also a writer at CSS-Tricks, and a podcaster at ShopTalk.

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Hannah Wolfe

Developer of the Year

Hannah is the co-founder of new blogging platform Ghost and its Chief Technology Officer. She describes herself a polyglot developer, is a lover of JavaScript and a Pythonista in the making.

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Geri Coady

Designer of the Year

Geri is a freelance designer and illustrator working in Newfoundland and Nottingham. In 2013 she was a contributor for the Pastry Box Project, wrote a Pocket Guide to Colour Accessibility, and spoke at conferences around the world.

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Harry Roberts

Young Developer of the Year

Harry is a consultant front-end architect from the UK, who writes, tweets, speaks and shares code about authoring and scaling CSS for big websites. He is behind the inuit.css framework and went freelance last year.

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Katie Kovalcin

Young Designer of the Year

Katie is a designer at Happy Cog in Austin, creating beautiful, functional design systems and writing articles for Cognition. Outside work she teaches at Girl Develop It, an initiative to get more young women into coding.

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Jennie Lamere

Emerging Talent of the Year

Jen is an 18-year-old freshman at Rochester Institute of Technology. She won the grand prize at Boston’s TVNext Hack for inventing an app that hides TV show spoilers, and she's Twitter’s youngest-ever intern.

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Simon Willison and Natalie Downe

Entrepreneur of the Year

Natalie and Simon started Lanyrd as a side project idea on their honeymoon and last year sold the site to Eventbrite and released a collection of new features to bring Eventbrite and Lanyrd’s worlds closer together.

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Haraldur Thorleifsson

Best Online Portfolio

Haraldur is a creative director and designer of things that appear on screens. He lives a nomadic lifestyle, staying for a few months in each city he moves to, and works mainly for clients in the San Francisco Bay area.

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Can I Use (Beta)

Side Project of the Year

Can I Use is a compatibility table for modern browsers, including mobile. If you’re looking to use an HTML5, CSS3, or SVG feature and need to know if a certain browser plays nicely with it, hit up Can I Use.

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Keith Clark: CSS 3D FPS

Demo of the Year

A 3D world with lighting, shadows and collision-detection created with CSS3 transforms and HTML. Built by Keith Clark for testing the feasibility of creating 3D environments using these technologies.

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MailChimp: In-house

Redesign of the Year

The MailChimp redesign is a masterclass in reinvention. The team used rapid-fire usability testing to get immediate feedback. This data – and more besides – informed the decision making process.

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24 ways

Best Collaborative Project

The annual advent calendar for web geeks has been going since 2005. With the help of its 24 dedicated authors, for twenty-four days each December 24 Ways publishes a daily dose of web design and development goodness.

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ShopTalk

Podcast of the Year

ShopTalk is a weekly podcast about front end web design, development and UX, hosted by CSS-Tricks founder Chris Coyier and Paravel lead developer Dave Rupert. Each episode has a special guest to talk shop and answer questions.

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CreativeMornings

Grassroots Event of the Year

Creative Mornings is a breakfast lecture series for the creative community, founded by Tina Roth Eisenberg. Volunteer hosts organise local chapters (there are now 77 cities around the world) for free monthly short talks and breakfast.

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Mike Monteiro: How Designers Destroyed the World

Conference Talk of the Year

Mike, the co-founder of Mule in San Francisco, delivered this inspirational talk at the WebStock conference in New Zealand about the need for designers to consider the impact of their work on the world around them.

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Sublime Text

App of the Year

Sublime Text is a sophisticated, cross-platform text editor for code, markup and prose with a slick user interface, extraordinary features and amazing performance. It's a firm industry favourite.

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Sass

Game Changer of the Year

Sass describes itself as CSS with superpowers and it truly is. It’s fully compatible with all versions of CSS, has more features than any other extension language, it's loved by the industry and backed by a huge community.

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Web Components

Best New Web Technology

Web Components enable developers to use HTML, CSS and JavaScript to build encapulated, reusable widgets that work across desktop and mobile. Building with Web Components keeps your code small, efficient and easy to maintain.

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Grunt

Open Source Project of the Year

Grunt is a JavaScript task runner, which automates repetitive tasks and boasts a huge ecosystem that grows daily as new plug-ins are being released. With its focus on banishing mundane tasks, it’s little wonder Grunt is so popular.

We are already looking forward to next year!